Posted in Nature, Photography, Trekking and Mountaineering

on an autumn beholden…

buy provigil from canada ‘…we find ourselves inhabitants of the last few living cells of a dying god’

Tastylia italy – Billy Kazee

Length and heights are rather, or obviously, perpendicular concepts… sprinkle a bit of an existential’s quandaries and we have an interesting concoction as one tries to grapple with their own pinnacle… for memories are created from that fleeting moment of the spectacular built brick by brick from the tribulations of the mundane… a runner crossing the finish line is a sum total of that training miles as a cicada emerging from its shell is the fruit of seventeen years of burrowed hermitage… as the pinnacle gets higher, the journey gets longer, yet the summit remains transient, a few moments bundled together in haste…

That was broadly the ideological premise I was trying to find comfort in while panting through a series of annoying heartburns, instigated by the sight of an entire slope punctuated with Bramh Kamal… though we’ve encountered the famed flower on almost every sojourn in the mountains, but never at this scale…

Bramh Kamal (Saussurea obvallata) flower, near Asurbag Campsite, Great Himalayan National Park, Himachal Pradesh, India

We were meandering our way towards the source of Tirthan River in Great Himalayan National Park, taking a circular route which took us through an enchanting, isolated backcountry… the stories that took us on this trail painted a vivid meadow at Asurbag, a riot of colours that makes all the bushwhacking worth its weight in (mountain) gold…

Thus ’twas a tad disappointing when after reaching the thatch in pitch dark, we found the meadow draped in a carpet of green instead of the prismatic feast we’d imagined the next morning… to top it up, it’d been drizzling incessantly since six in the morning, and we found ourselves huddled around the crackling fire inside the thatch in tandem with the pitter patter outside… there was no way we would be breaking camp in this weather, and so we retreated to the tent for a siesta enforced purely by boredom…

The cry for lunch at two in the afternoon greeted us without the rain, though ’twas still overcast… pressed for time as one is in the outdoors wringing it out of corporate rigmaroles, we decided to attempt a small summit that flanked the meadow and did not look technical, although it did turn out to be quite rocky at the top and we had to retreat about a couple of hundred meters off it as the weather closed in, and it is by quintessence higher than it seems, but walking through a natural pharmacy does have its therapeutic hangovers…

Bramh Kamal (Saussurea obvallata) flower, near Asurbag Campsite, Great Himalayan National Park, Himachal Pradesh, India

I was half marvelling at the flowers and half cussing the impatience dealing with heartburns as we’d scooted off immediately after lunch… there is hardly any point in drawling off the myriad connections of the flower with Hindu Mythology or Tibetan Medicine for that matter which have nudged the species into that basket of impending extinction, but the flower does remain a sight to behold, more so as one looks at the fragile integrants that come together to become an example of resilience, the translucent greenish papery bracts that somehow ward off the chilling winds of the higher climes, the purple tinge of the flowerhead that can sway either way, the roots that like many of its brethren, steeped in compounds with an innate knowledge human physiology, all of this rolled up into a wet and frigid canvas of monsoons and autumn…

A hushed call from my partner, signalling towards the silhouette of a partridge peeping out from behind a rock broke the trance, and with another irritating burp we started crawling on all fours towards the bird, the floral poesy giving way to faunal aspirations…

Bramh Kamal (Saussurea obvallata) flower, near Asurbag Campsite, Great Himalayan National Park, Himachal Pradesh, India

go to site Musings on Bramh Kamal (Saussurea obvallata), near Asurbag Campsite, Great Himalayan National Park, Himachal Pradesh

Parth Joshi

Allured by the outdoors, the author is made up in parts of that quintessential lost soul wreathing under the pangs of biophilia in a desk job, a wannabe elegist mostly ending up in dungeons of poetasters and an optimist waiting for the senility of the modern world to fade away while sampling shoots and leaves.

In saner times, he has a keen interest in areas pertaining to tourism, history, agriculture and climate change, especially with respect to historical interpretations, emerging technologies and future livelihoods.

An avid trekker, runner, cyclist, birder and photographer, he is more often than not found gloating over anything hinterland, on foot or over computer monitors, and fantasizing solutions that can foster ‘inclusive’ growth and sustainable livelihoods for communities at the grassroots.

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