Posted in Art, Culture, Travel, Trekking and Mountaineering

on journeys of infinitesimals…

Every block of stone has a statue inside it and it is the task of the sculptor to discover it. 

Michelangelo

When it comes down to it, a painter or sculptor is but a disciple of geometric forms, working in combinations of arcs and angles to create visual tangibilities on a variety of canvasses…

Watching a group of artists working intently on the frescoes in a temple roofed over by a giant 70 m statue of Shakyamuni Buddha (the temple was inaugurated a year after our visit by the Dalai Lama, built from funds pooled in by Ladakhi ex-servicemen, maybe an elegy to the devastating floods of 2014), I wondered if form preceded colour… for all the colours have to do was to meander along the contours defined by charcoal…

I pondered on the possibility of sitting put around the scaffoldings and watch the artisans in a verdant demonstration of patience and mathematical rigour, a swansong of abstractions… but then we were only acclimatising, and while the others had been loafing around in their Royal Enfields around these parts for a good ten days, I had to make do with one (blame those flight prices) before trudging up Stok Kangri, thus skipping lunch was not an option… 

Monasteries have been rather befuddled I feel, the Himalayan ones especially, partly because they reside in some of the most enchanting landscapes… by the same argument though, their complex visual tapestries are often overlooked due to the same scenery… but if images be fuelling imaginations, paintings be the ones to bring perspective…

Temple near Stok Monastery, Ladakh Himalayas, Jammu & Kashmir, August 2015…

Parth Joshi

Allured by the outdoors, the author is made up in parts of that quintessential lost soul wreathing under the pangs of biophilia in a desk job, a wannabe elegist mostly ending up in dungeons of poetasters and an optimist waiting for the senility of the modern world to fade away while sampling shoots and leaves.

In saner times, he has a keen interest in areas pertaining to tourism, history, agriculture and climate change, especially with respect to historical interpretations, emerging technologies and future livelihoods.

An avid trekker, runner, cyclist, birder and photographer, he is more often than not found gloating over anything hinterland, on foot or over computer monitors, and fantasizing solutions that can foster ‘inclusive’ growth and sustainable livelihoods for communities at the grassroots.

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